#Good: Still thinking about QoW #379

b4472-16678638-abstract-word-cloud-for-anti-realism-with-related-tags-and-termsHi Dr. Craig. Still chewing on QoW #379. I keep coming back to this video, especially Q & A, especially 01:01:07 & context … do you address Aquinas & divine simplicity (as relates to the rest of my question below) in your current lectures?

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cVoXs4qQIl8&feature=youtu.be&t=1h1m1s

Also, does this correctly represent your view?…

1. Numbers. Anti-realist that they exist as abstractions apart from God. Mathematical statements have only logical, not ontological, truth.

2. The Good. Anti-realist that it exists as abstraction apart from God. When moral statements are true, they are not merely logically true — they are true to God’s being. So you’re not really anti-realist here, since you grant the Good’s ontology is God…right? (I would argue this was what Socrates was birthing in his dialogue with Euthyphro.)

Question A: How do you answer someone who believes moral truths are logically, not ontologically, true?

Question B: Couldn’t your answer to question A be adapted, in combination with what Socrates was actually getting at, to obliterate anti-realism or “merely logically true”-ism with respect to mathematical truth?

And since I’ve made no reference to concepts in God’s mind…is my view conceptualism, or just divine essentialism?

Thanks :)

Note: Just submitted the above as a new question of the week. Hopeful.

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About Maryann

Maryann Spikes is the past President of the Christian Apologetics Alliance. She blogs at Ichthus77, and loves apologetics and philosophy. In particular she loves to study all things Euthyphro Dilemma and Golden Rule. A para-educator (autism) for five years, she holds a Certificate in Christian Apologetics from Biola University, an AA in Humanities via Modesto Junior College, and moonlights as a freelancer. You can follow her on Twitter @Ichthus77, connect with the Ichthus77 community on Facebook, or look her up on Google+.
This entry was posted in Apologetics, Epistemology, Ethics & Metaethics, Euthyphro Dilemma. Bookmark the permalink.

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