Richard Dawkins: The Empty Chair

Pictured below is the Empty Chair that was reserved for Dawkins to follow the eighth commandment he quoted in The God Delusion:  “Never seek to censor or cut yourself off from dissent; always respect the right of others to disagree with you.”  Dawkins refused to show up to the Sheldonian Theatre October 25 to debate the world’s leading Christian apologist, William Lane Craig.

“The Ultimate 747 Gambit is a very serious argument against the existence of God and one to which I have yet to hear a theologian give a convincing answer, despite numerous opportunities and invitations to do so,” says Dawkins in the video below:

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About Maryann

Maryann Spikes is the past President of the Christian Apologetics Alliance and now coordinates the CAA Catechism. She blogs at Ichthus77, and loves apologetics and philosophy. In particular she loves to study all things Euthyphro Dilemma and Golden Rule. A para-educator (autism) for five years, she holds a Certificate in Christian Apologetics from Biola University, an AA in Humanities via Modesto Junior College, and moonlights as a freelancer. You can follow her on Twitter @Ichthus77, connect with the Ichthus77 community on Facebook, or look her up on Google+.
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4 Responses to Richard Dawkins: The Empty Chair

  1. UK says:

    This is a weak book in addressing the ultimate paradox of atheism: is there absolute truths? Let's make this practical. Do you know everything? Do you know half of everything? Do you know 1% of everything? Let's be incredibly gracious and suppose that you know 1% of everything there is to know. Thomas Edison confidently declared, 'We do not know a millionth of one percent about anything.' Nevertheless, given the supposition that you know 1% of everything, is it possible that evidence proving God's existence exists in the 99% of everything you don't know? If you're honest, you'll have to admit that it's a real possibility. The fact is, since you don't possess all knowledge, you don't know if such evidence exists or not. Thus, you cannot be a atheist – you don't know that God doesn't exist. You're an agnostic.

  2. Maryann says:

    UK, that's an argument for skepticism in general and applies not only to theism or atheism but to every knowledge claim. I've addressed it elsewhere on the blog–see “Norris' Epistemology book discussion” link to the right. Btw, I'm a Christian.

  3. Anonymous says:

    UK confuses knowledge and belief. I have no knowledge of evidence to support the ability to predict the future by boiling a donkey head – even though many used to claim this ability. There is NO information or rational basis available to suppose that this is or will be true, therefore I remain an “acepholomancist”. Should information become available, I can review that.

    Likewise, I don't KNOW for certain whether god exists or not, but based on what I know (scientific and philosophical study), there is absolutely no reason to believe that he does. Therefore I am an atheist. Atheism is the rational position for all thinking persons.

  4. Have you read an apologetics book?

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